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Monthly Archives: September 2016

(Shared by my friend GK)
It’s Tuesday and I’m very tired. Thank God for this joke to get through another morning.  No offense intended.

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Corporate joke from a friend…

A woman in hot air balloon realized she was lost…

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Photos from my trip to Taitung during the Hot Air Balloon Festival.

She reduced altitude & shouted to a man  below “Excuse me, can you help me? I promised a friend to meet him an hour ago but I don’t know where I am.”

Man below replied : You are in hot air balloon 30 feet above the ground. You are at 41 degree North latitude & 59 degree West longitude.

Lady : You must be an engineer.

Man : How do you know?

Lady : Everything you told me is technically correct but useless & the fact is I’m still lost.

Engineer : You must be in Top Management.

Lady : Ya. How do you know?

Engineer : You don’t know where you are or where you’re going, you have no technical knowledge.    You made a promise, which you’ve no idea how to keep & you expect people beneath you to solve your problems..!!

😀😀😀😃😃😃😄😄😄

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Presence, bringing your boldest self to your biggest challenges” by Amy Cuddy

Do you feel happy because you smile or do you smile because you’re happy?

According to Havard Business School Professor Amy Cuddy, who had a very successful 2012 TED Talk and now a book to further explore some game changing research insights, the body shapes the mind.

I highly recommend both reading the book as well as watching the TED Talk. In the TED talk she showed visuals emphasising some of the power moves realistically.

In one of her first experiments, she recruited 200 subjects online and prompted them to imagine themselves holding either a high-power or low-power pose for 2 minutes. Then she instructed them to picture strangers walking in and out of the room as they were holding the pose and form impressions of these strangers.

Among the people who’d imagined themselves holding high power poses, 70 percent used words such as:

Open and strong
Grounded and confident

Those who imagined themselves in low power poses had a much less pleasant experience: 72% used words as

Awkward and tense
Scared and lonely
Very very uncomfortable

Here, Professor Cuddy makes a case for feeling powerful.

Feeling powerless impairs thoughts
Powerlessness makes us self-absorbed

Power can protect us
Power can connect us
Power can incite action

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These are my fingers.

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I find these low power poses very familiar. Guilty as charged. Will stop myself from doing this.

As for the high power poses, while I can accept how they may improve a person’s confidence, how do you think it’ll be accepted by others in the room?

I showed this page to a few Asian working adults and the high power poses didn’t go down too well in our social context.

If you come to Asia, and put your feet on the table, never mind that we no longer believe in table gods, but it’s very threatening and disrespectful. Very rarely do you find bosses putting their feet on the table.

I once saw a photo of President Obama putting his elegant long legs on the table ofthe Oval Office in the presence of some aides and realised that in the US, this must be totally acceptable.

This is a great book with many interesting insights especially in contexts where bullying, gender differences and even during interviews where non-spoken gestures affect what is communicated.

Next time you feel powerless or anxious before an interview or an exam, do a power pose in your room or at least in your mind. Imagine yourself in a power pose.

Starfish up! Mind your posture throughout the day!

What you observe creates your reality.

Those of us who drive know the danger of blind spots and the need for side mirrors.

According to Shawn Achor of “Before Happiness“, a reality at work based on only one vantage point is limited and full of blind spots and that prevents forward movement.

Achor suggests that the perspective is in the details. He cites Dr Irwin Braverman, a professor at Yale School of Medicine and Linda Friedlaender, the curator at the Yale Centre for British Art who came up with an exercise that helped doctors improve a skill that actually could save lives.

In the midst of training, students were taken to an art museum to see the world in multiple dimensions.

The Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the students who took this class exhibited a 10% improvement in their ability to detect important medical details.

“Once they are able to see this wider rave of details, they were better able to leverage their IQ and EQ and all their other cognitive abilities to knit these details together and see previously missed connections.

Those details were the vantage points that broadened their perspective and made them more successful in their work. ”

Achor notes that in medicine , as in all professions, it is easy to get stuck seeing things from only one vantage point and approach problems with a broader and deeper perspective.

He gave the example of a doctor who observes the lips of a patient and noticed something all other doctors missed and saved the patient’s life.

Seeing reality from different angles can allow us to open our eyes to a broader range of opportunities and connect more deeply with our team and family.

Please also catch Shawn Achor’s very humorous TED talk.

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Broken pot becomes a work of art. At the 2016 Singapore Garden Festival.

When one door closes, another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us.

– Alexander Graham Bell (inventor)

When heaven is about to confer a great responsibility on any man, it will exercise his mind with suffering, subject his sinews and bones to hard work, put him to poverty, place obstacles in the paths of his deeds, so as to stimulate his mind, harden his nature, and improve wherever he is incompetent.

-Meng-tzu 盟 子

It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life. Where you stumble, there lies your treasure.

Joseph Campbell, Writer

If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant; if we did not sometimes taste adversity, prosperity would not be so welcomed.

Anne Dudley Bradstreet Poet

A psychologist carrying a glass of water , asked her class to guess how heavy they think it was? 10g, 50g, 200g ?

Answer?

The question is not how heavy a glass is. But how long you’ve been carrying it. Even a glass can ache your arm if you’ve been carrying it a long time.

How are you copying with residual stress in your life? Something which may even be a trivial matter, a bad memory can weigh on you and cause undue stress, if you’ve been carrying it for a long time.

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(Breakfast with B)
Shen & Co
140 Upper Bukit Timah Road #01-01/04, Beauty World Plaza, Singapore 588176

Don’t sweat the small stuff.